QUIET HOUSE FRANCE BY ARTELABO

QUIET HOUSE FRANCE BY ARTELABO

Quiet House France by Artelabo
Artelabo : Located in a village in the south of France, the project of “quiet villa” meets a very particular context.
Quiet House France by Artelabo
Quiet House France by Artelabo
The land on which it fits, of very small size, is located between a vineyard shed in operation to the West, the parking of a neighbour to the East, surrounded by their access road, a main street to the south. Oriented to the North, it is also subject to a regime of prevailing winds. But it enjoys an exceptional and breathtaking view on the valley.
Quiet House France by Artelabo
Quiet House France by Artelabo
The aim of the project is therefore to create the conditions for an intimacy, an introverted house, hidden from the sight, entirely turned towards the landscape. Its architecture is characterized by a regular, simple and systematic composition, using a banal constructive language and an obvious formal register, which, by disrupting the codes of the usual, gives a singular aesthetic to be seen.
Quiet House France by Artelabo
Quiet House France by Artelabo
Using regular measures, the project is based on a grid of 3m in width and 4m in depth. Two units of space correspond to a built volume, the third forms an outer space. The overall geometry of the house is based on a repeated sequence of four volumes, inscribed in a regular pattern, enclosed within a peripheral wall, and organizing four courtyards within the dwelling. Their form, with two slopes of roof, evokes a small house.
Quiet House France by Artelabo
Quiet House France by Artelabo
One the one side, the expression of the project refers directly to the question of domesticity and traditional individual habitat, as well as the constructive means employed, banal and typical of the south of France (masonry, plaster, roof tile) create a contextual, cultural and landscape link between the construction and its site. One the other side, its compositional play and its lack of lateral opening make it a strange architectural object.
Quiet House France by Artelabo
Quiet House France by Artelabo
A large fixed frame opens wide the house on the landscape. Its powerful contrast between its opaque and closed external appearance and the intensity of the light provided by courtyards, gives strength to its interior space. All rooms open on one, two or three courtyards and the panorama, through a single system of aligned glass doors. The same flooring is used throughout the project, which creates confusion between the spaces of the house and those of the courtyards, which are real living rooms and extensions of the interior spaces, allowing to be inside while being outside
Quiet House France by Artelabo
Quiet House France by Artelabo
Quiet House France by Artelabo
Some signs make its mediterranean lifestyle tangible : a steel grid with reminiscent motifs of « moucharabieh », an entrance opening on a courtyard , a very white coating reflecting light and summer heat … With its great brightness in all seasons, its an animated picture on the landscape in the background, or its changing looks on the sky, the home offers a serene poetic, and intimate living environment. The quiet villa, thus creating its context, its way of life, shows by very simple means, the possible offered by the architecture.
Quiet House France by Artelabo
Quiet House France by Artelabo
Quiet House France by Artelabo
Photo Courtesy : Marie-Caroline Lucat

 

Queen Bee    Queen Bee

A True Queen by heart, she is always bringing us the most stylish decor tips from every part of the globe.She is known as one of the best Interior & Décor Content Contributors. Stylish & Glamorous – We are always waiting for her uber chic design suggestions…you may get them too…by following her.

THESE BIODEGRADABLE BURIAL POD WILL TURN YOUR DECEASED LOVED ONE INTO A TREE

THESE BIODEGRADABLE BURIAL POD WILL TURN YOUR DECEASED LOVED ONE INTO A TREE

Capsula Mundi
Capsula Mundi : We don’t need any schooling on how dead bodies are treated under different cultural practices. A variety of age-old practices lands dead bodies under the ground or for cremation. But what if you could just turn a deceased loved one into a tree?
After a person has died, the remains of the body are encased inside a pod which is planted in the soil with a tree above it.
Capsula Mundi
Over the period of time, the tree takes all the nutrients it needs to grow, from the body.  “A cemetery will no longer be full of tombstones and will become a sacred forest.”
Capsula Mundi
This egg-shaped pod is a biodegradable plastic shell, that breaks down and the remains provide nutrients to a sapling planted right above it.
As for now, the designers have only launched a version which is ash-only, however, they do plan to bring in a capsule to encapsulate the whole body.
Capsula Mundi
Photo Courtesy : Capsula Mundi

 

Design Devil    Design Devil

Design Devil is a multifaceted designer-writer-design analyst who touches upon conceptual interior development, communicate about the essence of designs and talks about design theories. Severely critical in his design analysis and approach, he is the best we got!!! By following his articles , you would get the best in global design information which no one else may share with you …. So follow him

METU GRADUATE STUDENTS GUESTHOUSE BY UYGUR ARCHITECTS

METU GRADUATE STUDENTS GUESTHOUSE BY UYGUR ARCHITECTS

METU Graduate Students Guesthouse by Uygur Architects
Uygur Architects : The dormitory building in METU Campus is built for accommodating graduate students during their studies. The building is designed by Uygur Architects based inAnkara, Turkey, as a living environment for academicians of different age groups and professions.
METU Graduate Students Guesthouse by Uygur Architects
METU Graduate Students Guesthouse by Uygur Architects
METU Graduate Students Guesthouse by Uygur Architects
METU Graduate Students Guesthouse by Uygur Architects
The project’s core unit is designed as a singular cell for one person that includes a sleeping and studying space. This core cell is repeated in the five-story building with angular articulations reminiscent of different streets. The organization of different cells for single, twin or quadruple use and their articulation creates the linear planning of the building. The living units are not placed in a hierarchical or consecutive order. Therefore different living practices and layers can be experienced within the building.
METU Graduate Students Guesthouse by Uygur Architects
METU Graduate Students Guesthouse by Uygur Architects
METU Graduate Students Guesthouse by Uygur Architects
The blocks of the building that include the living units are placed in an angular order, with regard to the size of the lot, direction of the sun path and the prevailing wind. Those linear blocks meet up in the center as a knot, creating the common shared spaces that people can encounter with each other. The linear blocks housing the living units divert from this knot creating angular distances between each other in an increasing level of privacy.
METU Graduate Students Guesthouse by Uygur Architects
METU Graduate Students Guesthouse by Uygur Architects

 

Travel Journo    Travel Journo

A Globetrotter with endless appetite to travel. Always looking for something unique in Interior trends and getting us, the best of every new design trend. All new interior décor trends happening under the might Sun, cannot escape his eyes… follow him to follow the best in global design trends.

ADJAYE ASSOCIATES TO DESIGN NEW PUBLIC LIBRARY AND CIVIC CENTRE IN FLORIDA

ADJAYE ASSOCIATES TO DESIGN NEW PUBLIC LIBRARY AND CIVIC CENTRE IN FLORIDA

Adjaye Associates to Design New Public Library And Civic Centre in Florida
Adjaye Associates : Adjaye Associates have announced the design of a new 50,000 square foot library and event center in Winter Park, Florida, which will serve as a new civic hub and will compliment the nearby Martin Luther King Jr. Park. The $30 million building also includes an 8,500 square foot civic center, combining as a manifestation of the city’s aspirations for library services.
“Winter Park’s vision for this project truly embraces the continued evolution of the library in the 21st century,” said Sir David Adjaye. “With a diverse program that recognizes it as a critical piece of cultural infrastructure, this will be a dynamic space for shared education, recreation, and interaction.”
Adjaye Associates to Design New Public Library And Civic Centre in Florida
With a global reputation for its unique approach to libraries and other civic architecture, the firm’s previous work includes two neighborhood libraries in Washington D.C. as well as the acclaimed Idea Stores in Tower Hamlets, London. Adjaye’s most recent endeavor was The National Museum of African-American History and Culture, in addition to his recent knighting in January this year.
“With the team’s incredible talents at work, we are confident that the new library and events center will be one of Winter Park’s premier locations for education, business support, and community collaboration,” said Winter Park Public Library Executive Director Shawn Shaffer.
As the lead design architects, Adjaye Associates will be working in collaboration withHuntonBrady Architects, who will act as the executive architects. Construction on the library is set to begin next month.
Photo Courtesy : Adjaye Associates

 

Queen Bee    Queen Bee

A True Queen by heart, she is always bringing us the most stylish decor tips from every part of the globe.She is known as one of the best Interior & Décor Content Contributors. Stylish & Glamorous – We are always waiting for her uber chic design suggestions…you may get them too…by following her.

SHEPPARD WILSON HOUSE IS DESIGNED TO VIEW A HERITAGE-LISTED MORETON BAY FIG TREE

SHEPPARD WILSON HOUSE IS DESIGNED TO VIEW A HERITAGE-LISTED MORETON BAY FIG TREE

Sheppard Wilson House is Designed to View a Heritage-listed Moreton Bay Fig Tree
Sam Crawford Architects : There’s an understated quality in Sam Crawford’s residential projects that makes them appear all the more stylish and elegant. The Sydney-based principal of Sam Crawford Architects doesn’t believe in bells and whistles and his signature thoughtful approach primarily focuses on the client’s comfort. Homes need not make flashy architectural statements; rather they can be intelligently designed places for everyday living, as his recently completed addition in Sydney’s Bronte attests.
Sheppard Wilson House is Designed to View a Heritage-listed Moreton Bay Fig Tree
The project’s modest existing weatherboard cottage is one of the beachside suburb’s original houses. When clients Neil Sheppard and Emma Wilson first approached Sam it was with a relatively ambitious brief calling for an extension that would accommodate two kids’ bedrooms, at least one guestroom, a study, an open-plan living space and a kids’ area.
Sheppard Wilson House is Designed to View a Heritage-listed Moreton Bay Fig Tree
Because they didn’t have any preconceptions, Sam was free to explore different ideas; however, it was clear that there was only one solution. “With most clients we’ll suggest a soft transition to the rear that’s in sympathy with the existing house, but in this case the brief called for something larger than could ever be accommodated in a form that would sit easily with the cottage,” he says. “So we did something completely different and set it a long way back from the street.”
Sheppard Wilson House is Designed to View a Heritage-listed Moreton Bay Fig Tree
The cottage is in one of a number of Waverley Council’s Heritage Urban Conservation Areas and while the new two-storey addition complies with the presiding height restrictions, it’s still generous in scale. This generosity of proportion is balanced by the massive Moreton Bay fig tree at the western rear of the property and the hulking three-storey neighbour on the south. It ensures that the addition is not out of place and is resolutely mindful of its richly eclectic suburban context.
A sense of cohesion between new and old was also of visual importance to the overall scheme, so first Sam renovated the existing cottage to near-original condition. The refurbishment not only restored the structure, but also helped meet the brief’s programmatic requirements. He divided the large front room into the study and guestroom and inserted a new bathroom in between. A discreet bifold door in the corridor can be used to zone this area from the rest of the house, providing guests with privacy.
Sheppard Wilson House is Designed to View a Heritage-listed Moreton Bay Fig Tree
It’s a logical plan that aligns rooms on the northern side with the corridor running east on the south. The corridor’s side wall is original, retained closer to the boundary than Sam was permitted to build. Tucked neatly behind the guestroom is the kids’ area/TV room that sits within the cottage’s original footprint and abuts the courtyard. “We always try to incorporate a courtyard space that’s facing north and can be opened up. We thought it would be nice to have a table here and use the large window as a bench to sit on. And the windows [of the TV room] also open up the whole corner of the cottage,” Sam explains.
This transitional zone gives rise to the threshold between the existing structure and the new addition, in which the corridor cleanly “extends” into the stair. Sam introduces ironbark to the material palette and uses it dynamically yet judiciously to contrast with the oak timber flooring. Applying the darker timber to the stair, three-step threshold and large window reveal creates definition and visual intrigue in a zone that would have appeared washed out without such material accents.
Sheppard Wilson House is Designed to View a Heritage-listed Moreton Bay Fig Tree
An expansive, light-drenched open plan characterizes the addition’s living areas. The space is minimal and clean, heightened by a three-metre-high ceiling and a deliberate lack of embellishment. A custom concrete kitchen island installed below a spotted gum panel feature, plus blackened aluminium window and door frames, anchors the space without detracting from the view.
The rear wall’s full-height glass doors welcome the outside in and frame the heritage-listedMoreton Bay fig tree. “That tree is the biggest, most impressive part of the site,” says Sam. “And because of the hill behind it, it gives [the plan] a beautiful sense of spaciousness.” The large glass doors also capture as much sunlight as possible during the winter months (along with the high row of north-facing windows), while the tree serves to shade the house during summer.
Sheppard Wilson House is Designed to View a Heritage-listed Moreton Bay Fig Tree
Sam uses passive design to great effect in order to avoid airconditioning. The ceiling’s concrete slab keeps the upstairs bedrooms cool, as do the reverse brick veneer and discreet sunshading. A central circular skylight offers the bedrooms and bathroom another source of light, which reduces glare on the brightest of days. The overall scheme is quietly hardworking – it’s a home that is both relaxed and comfortable. Sam’s attention to detail is strong, but nothing in the renovation or addition is laboured, making for an interior that is as well crafted as it is inviting.
Sheppard Wilson House is Designed to View a Heritage-listed Moreton Bay Fig Tree
Photo Courtesy : Brett Boardman

 

Design Devil    Design Devil

Design Devil is a multifaceted designer-writer-design analyst who touches upon conceptual interior development, communicate about the essence of designs and talks about design theories. Severely critical in his design analysis and approach, he is the best we got!!! By following his articles , you would get the best in global design information which no one else may share with you …. So follow him

AV LOFT BY ARHITEKTURA BUDJEVAC IN NIŠ SERBIA

AV LOFT BY ARHITEKTURA BUDJEVAC IN NIŠ SERBIA

AV Loft by Arhitektura Budjevac In Niš Serbia
Arhitektura Budjevac : The apartment is located in Niš, Serbia.  Its open-plan layout is mostly dictated by its tenant, a young male in his early 20s. The current layout is derived from two traditional apartments.
AV Loft by Arhitektura Budjevac In Niš Serbia
AV Loft by Arhitektura Budjevac In Niš Serbia
AV Loft by Arhitektura Budjevac In Niš Serbia
AV Loft by Arhitektura Budjevac In Niš Serbia
All of the walls have been  torn down, leaving concrete beams and one  column. All the concrete has  been left exposed. The bathroom is the only space separated from the rest of the apartment and well hidden behind wooden panels which emulate a stack of beams, covering up the wardrobe as well as the bathroom door.
AV Loft by Arhitektura Budjevac In Niš Serbia
AV Loft by Arhitektura Budjevac In Niš Serbia
AV Loft by Arhitektura Budjevac In Niš Serbia
AV Loft by Arhitektura Budjevac In Niš Serbia
AV Loft by Arhitektura Budjevac In Niš Serbia
AV Loft by Arhitektura Budjevac In Niš Serbia
The bedroom is gently separated  by a glass partition, which  can  be additionally screened with  a  curtain. The apartment’s interior is extrovert in its nature, yet some of its elements are rather introverted. Made of  black  glossy particle  board, the kitchen is hidden behind the harmonica system. White island contrasts with the black and follows a linear flow of the space.
AV Loft by Arhitektura Budjevac In Niš Serbia
AV Loft by Arhitektura Budjevac In Niš Serbia
Brick walls are positioned on the opposite sides of the space which makes them focal points of the apartment. They are visually connected by a wall-ceiling profile drifting along the space. Light exaggerates its form and gives it an atmospheric halo effect.
Photo Courtesy : Andreja Budjevac

 

Gossip Queen    Gossip Queen

She doesn’t need any introduction. She is quintessentially the part of every gossip – sorry – networking circle in Design World. She is always updated with the best of Designers and their small beautiful World. If you would like your Interiors to be club class, then follow our advice and network with her..

NELSON MANDELA CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL IN JOHANNESBURG

NELSON MANDELA CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL IN JOHANNESBURG

Nelson Mandela Children’s Hospital  In Johannesburg
Sheppard RobsonJohn Cooper Architecture (JCA) : UK-based architecture firms Sheppard Robson and John Cooper Architecture (JCA) collaborated in 2009 to win an international design competition for the new Nelson Mandela Children’s Hospital in Johannesburg. The facility will employ 150 pediatric doctors and 450 nurses.
Sheppard Robson and JCA, responsible for the concept design of the hospital, were joined by local architects GAPP and Ruben Reddy. GAPP Architects & Urban Designers were responsible for the development of the facade and public spaces within the hospital, whilst Ruben Reddy Architects were the local lead and site architects, with a scope that included the design development of the clinical and operational facilities of the building and overall coordination.
NELSON MANDELA CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL IN JOHANNESBURG
The vision
The team drew together specialist design skills with local experience and expertise to deliver the vision for the new hospital, which centred on creating a modern state-of-the-art paediatric tertiary facility located on the University of the Witwatersrand’s education campus in Parktown,Johannesburg – a central position allowing it to service the needs of the region’s populations.
The design is a 200-bed, eight-theatre facility, with advanced diagnostics and future plans for expansion to 300 beds. It will operate in partnership with the University of the Witwatersrand Medical School as a primary base, and will engage with all medical training facilities across the region.
The hospital includes specialist facilities for the treatment of: cardiovascular, neurological, haematological, oncological, endocrine, metabolic and renal diseases. The project also includes facilities for paediatric surgery, whilst supporting paediatric academic research and training.
A key element of the brief was to construct a hospital that provides high-quality child healthcare in a natural healing environment. This focus on connecting to nature would go on to shape the design of the project and be a starting point to creating a welcoming, safe environment for both children and parents.
NELSON MANDELA CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL IN JOHANNESBURG
The design
The competition-winning design broke away from housing all departments in a single ‘box’ building, which often leads to deep floorplates where the patients and staff have little contact with the outside world. After extensive consultation, it was clear that long, institutional and windowless corridors should be avoided in favour of a plan that connected to its natural surroundings.
Sheppard Robson and JCA’s concept revolved around creating six wings, each with its own specialism. These were connected by a ‘street’ that ran through the centre of the project. This ‘street’ was vital for connectivity, with three main junctions that enable efficient flow of people. The separation of floors of floors avoided cross-overs and assisted wayfinding.
By breaking down the mass of the building into six elements, the design has a domestic, human scale that reassuring and familiar to children. Further moving away from a feeling of institutional design, each wing has subtle twists of the common design language to give it a distinct identity; for example, the colour of the solar shading walls – formed from horizontal rails – changes for each department, picking up on vibrant, local colours.
NELSON MANDELA CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL IN JOHANNESBURG
This composition increased the length of the perimeter of the building and created shallow floorplates. This meant more natural light could flood into the building, placing many treatment spaces next to windows which made the most of the views out over the surrounding landscape as well into the internal courtyards created in between the hospital’s wings.
Spaces that invite contemplation, the five internal therapeutic courtyards and the three exterior therapy gardens were designed for occupational therapy and children’s play. The landscape is predominantly indigenous, using plant species found in the nearby Melville Koppies Nature Reserve. The external spaces were created with healing in mind, and the design encourages patients to use the outdoor spaces as part of their recovery.
The wards are positioned on the second floors of the wings to maximise views out, whilst more heavily serviced, critical care facilities are located in more private spaces on the lower levels.
Commenting on the opening of the building, Sheppard Robson said: “Having worked on the project for the last seven years, it’s particular satisfying to see the important and remarkable facility open its doors
“The design creates a close connection between nature and the healing process, with the architectural language of the project a beacon that shines out over the city from its prominent location.”
The palette of materials is characterised by orange brick which makes reference to the region’s red clay soil. The pronounced ends of each wing rise to a sweeping peak, designed to give the building a distinct architectural form that makes the hospital identifiable from a distance and animates it when viewed close-up.
NELSON MANDELA CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL IN JOHANNESBURG
Sheppard Robson’s interior design group, ID: SR, also worked on the project, helping create a clear and coherent wayfinding solution and designing the internal finishes for shared spaces, including the corridor, reception and family rooms.
The wayfinding was designed in collaboration with local graphic designers Black Bird Designand incorporated a number of artworks completed by children at project workshops. Rather than being text-based, much of the wayfinding uses colour and symbols to ease navigation for children and the different nationalities that will use the hospital.
Photo Courtesy : Tristan McLaren

 

Travel Journo    Travel Journo

A Globetrotter with endless appetite to travel. Always looking for something unique in Interior trends and getting us, the best of every new design trend. All new interior décor trends happening under the might Sun, cannot escape his eyes… follow him to follow the best in global design trends.