QUIET HOUSE FRANCE BY ARTELABO

QUIET HOUSE FRANCE BY ARTELABO

Quiet House France by Artelabo
Artelabo : Located in a village in the south of France, the project of “quiet villa” meets a very particular context.
Quiet House France by Artelabo
Quiet House France by Artelabo
The land on which it fits, of very small size, is located between a vineyard shed in operation to the West, the parking of a neighbour to the East, surrounded by their access road, a main street to the south. Oriented to the North, it is also subject to a regime of prevailing winds. But it enjoys an exceptional and breathtaking view on the valley.
Quiet House France by Artelabo
Quiet House France by Artelabo
The aim of the project is therefore to create the conditions for an intimacy, an introverted house, hidden from the sight, entirely turned towards the landscape. Its architecture is characterized by a regular, simple and systematic composition, using a banal constructive language and an obvious formal register, which, by disrupting the codes of the usual, gives a singular aesthetic to be seen.
Quiet House France by Artelabo
Quiet House France by Artelabo
Using regular measures, the project is based on a grid of 3m in width and 4m in depth. Two units of space correspond to a built volume, the third forms an outer space. The overall geometry of the house is based on a repeated sequence of four volumes, inscribed in a regular pattern, enclosed within a peripheral wall, and organizing four courtyards within the dwelling. Their form, with two slopes of roof, evokes a small house.
Quiet House France by Artelabo
Quiet House France by Artelabo
One the one side, the expression of the project refers directly to the question of domesticity and traditional individual habitat, as well as the constructive means employed, banal and typical of the south of France (masonry, plaster, roof tile) create a contextual, cultural and landscape link between the construction and its site. One the other side, its compositional play and its lack of lateral opening make it a strange architectural object.
Quiet House France by Artelabo
Quiet House France by Artelabo
A large fixed frame opens wide the house on the landscape. Its powerful contrast between its opaque and closed external appearance and the intensity of the light provided by courtyards, gives strength to its interior space. All rooms open on one, two or three courtyards and the panorama, through a single system of aligned glass doors. The same flooring is used throughout the project, which creates confusion between the spaces of the house and those of the courtyards, which are real living rooms and extensions of the interior spaces, allowing to be inside while being outside
Quiet House France by Artelabo
Quiet House France by Artelabo
Quiet House France by Artelabo
Some signs make its mediterranean lifestyle tangible : a steel grid with reminiscent motifs of « moucharabieh », an entrance opening on a courtyard , a very white coating reflecting light and summer heat … With its great brightness in all seasons, its an animated picture on the landscape in the background, or its changing looks on the sky, the home offers a serene poetic, and intimate living environment. The quiet villa, thus creating its context, its way of life, shows by very simple means, the possible offered by the architecture.
Quiet House France by Artelabo
Quiet House France by Artelabo
Quiet House France by Artelabo
Photo Courtesy : Marie-Caroline Lucat

 

Queen Bee    Queen Bee

A True Queen by heart, she is always bringing us the most stylish decor tips from every part of the globe.She is known as one of the best Interior & Décor Content Contributors. Stylish & Glamorous – We are always waiting for her uber chic design suggestions…you may get them too…by following her.

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AN INTERVIEW WITH HENRY HOLLAND : WHO SEES LOT OF SYNERGIES BETWEEN FASHION AND HOMEWARE

AN INTERVIEW WITH HENRY HOLLAND : WHO SEES LOT OF SYNERGIES BETWEEN FASHION AND HOMEWARE

An Interview With Henry Holland : Who Sees Lot of Synergies between Fashion and Homeware
INDEX Design Series 2017 : The Interior Directory interviewed famous teen fashion designer Henry Holland who is appearing in Index Design Series Dubai 2017. After  graduating  from  the  London  College  of  Printing  with  a  BA  in  journalism,  Henry  Holland  was  catapulted  into  the  fashion limelight  in  2006 with his  irreverent fashion  groupies  slogan  tees,  featuring catchphrases  such  as Uhu Gareth  Pugh  and Get your freak on Giles Deacon. In February 2008, after two seasons showing with Fashion East,  House of Holland held its first solo show on the London Fashion Week schedule  to  critical  acclaim.  Now  in  its  10th  year,  House  of  Holland  is  firmly  established  in  the  international  fashion  arena  and  in January 2012 was awarded a two-season fashion forward sponsorship. One of Britains most exciting designers, Henry has carried his fashion philosophy seamlessly into his interior endeavours. The 33-year-old is making his INDEX debut just two months after the launch of his second interiors range with British décor giants Habitat, following the remarkable success of his debut line a year earlier. His style is famed for being bold and brash, featuring bright colours and a range of textures and patterns.
TID : You’ve just launched your second range with Habitat after your debut last year. Was the move from fashion into interiors a natural one for you?
HH: I see a lot of synergies between fashion and homeware – both in print as well as fabrication and techniques. For me the process is not completely alien but a learning experience of working in different scales, different formats and in different materials.
An Interview With Henry Holland : Who Sees Lot of Synergies between Fashion and Homeware
TID : Words like “bold”, “explosive” and “riotous” have been used to describe your style before. How would Henry Holland himself describe the new range?
HH: You’re pretty spot on there. This collection is a real riot of colour and the neon lime colour used in the bedding and the throw is really very bold. It is very true to the House of Holland DNA and completely the look at home for any fan of colour and playful print either in their wardrobe or their home.
TID : You previously described cushions as “being the new trainers”. Is the design of a home now a bigger reflection than ever of someone’s personality? And was it the prospect of being able to offer this reflection that tempted you into interiors?
HH: I love fashion for the way in which it can reflect who you are and what you are about. I feel like a home is very similar in that way and so dressing your home is a similar process for me as dressing myself. I want things that feel personal to me and that are a reflection of me, my partner and my personality.
An Interview With Henry Holland : Who Sees Lot of Synergies between Fashion and Homeware
TID : Where do you find your inspiration and what is your personal mantra when it comes to anything you design?
HH: It sounds silly but you really do find inspiration anywhere and in everything. I think as a creative person working in this industry, you pick up things from all around you from visual references to experiences, travel, people and stories. I love to tell stories through my clothes and it is individuals and their stories that have inspired me the most.
An Interview With Henry Holland : Who Sees Lot of Synergies between Fashion and Homeware
TID : How excited are you by the prospect of meeting thousands of designers from across the world at INDEX?
HH: I’m so excited about meeting thousands of designers. I love meeting new people, exploring opportunities and I also love to travel – so this really is a win-win.
An Interview With Henry Holland : Who Sees Lot of Synergies between Fashion and Homeware
TID : Dubai is known around the world as a city that is so exciting and forward thinking in its design and architecture. Is that something that attracted you to attend INDEX?
HH: The travel and the location being in Dubai definitely helped attract me to INDEX. I have been to Dubai several times before but not for years. I know that it is very fast developing and changing so I’m excited to see these changes for myself.
An Interview With Henry Holland : Who Sees Lot of Synergies between Fashion and Homeware
TID : Having had your big break at such a young age, what would your advice be to any up and coming creative working across any design discipline?
HH: My advice would be to always stay true to who you are deep down and what you are about both through your work and the way you interact with people. This industry is very hard work and having to pretend to be something that doesn’t come naturally to you on top of all of that work is exhausting. People really respond to authenticity in today’s fashion world more than anything else.
An Interview With Henry Holland : Who Sees Lot of Synergies between Fashion and Homeware
Henry will be appearing at the OFIS sponsored Design Talks at this years INDEX Design Series– taking place at the Dubai World Trade Centre, May 22-25, 2017. We are pleased to inform our readers . The Interior Directory is a proud media partner with INDEX Design Series Dubai 2017and would be getting you the live news and updates from the event.
Photo Courtesy : INDEX Design Series 2017 / Henry Holland 

 

Travel Journo    Travel Journo

A Globetrotter with endless appetite to travel. Always looking for something unique in Interior trends and getting us, the best of every new design trend. All new interior décor trends happening under the might Sun, cannot escape his eyes… follow him to follow the best in global design trends.

AN INTERVIEW WITH BETHAN GRAY : WINNER OF PRESTIGIOUS BEST BRITISH DESIGNER AWARD

AN INTERVIEW WITH BETHAN GRAY : WINNER OF PRESTIGIOUS BEST BRITISH DESIGNER AWARD

An Interview With Bethan Gray : Winner of Prestigious Best British Designer Award
Index Design Series Dubai 2017 : Bethan Gray,  winner  of  the prestigious Best  British  Designer  award,  has  an  extraordinary  background.  Her family  hails  from  an ancient  Rajasthani  clan  that  over  centuries  migrated  across  Arabia  and  Persia  before  settling  in  the  Celtic  heartland  of  Wales.  It’s  a journey and heritage that weaves a rich pattern of influences and inspirations, which draw on craft traditions of both East and West.
To this  Bethan  adds  an  innate  ability  to  translate  and  transform  a  variety of  cultural  references  into  iconic  contemporary  pieces. “Cultural referencing is at heart of my design philosophy. Through my travels and research I’m inspired to create original contemporary pieces that resonate with global, as well as local, audiences. I’m particularly drawn to the graphic nature of Islamic art and craft, says Bethan.  Her work has been exhibited in New York, Paris, Milan, London and Dubai, and her own boutique collections are available globally from leading retailers such as Harrods, Liberty, Le Bon Marche and Lane Crawford.
An Interview With Bethan Gray : Winner of Prestigious Best British Designer Award
TID : How excited are you to be making your debut appearance at INDEX?
BG: I’m really thrilled! I love the excitement of trade fairs, and am particularly intrigued by this year’s INDEX. It’s going to be fascinating to see for the first time all that is on offer across the show, as well as experience the fully-immersive features – I’m intrigued! We’ll be having elements from our Shamsian Collection on display both in the VIP Oasis, which was designed by our close partners Harrods Interiors, as well as on our stand in the Luxury Pavilion. I can’t wait to hear the feedback.  It’s going to be a busy show!
TID : You describe your signature style as incorporating “a love of detail, tactile textures, and luxurious materials such as semi-precious stones, marble, wood, and hand-tooled leather”. INDEX 2017 is all about design for the senses. Do you consider that kind of sensory stimulation a vital part of design and, if so, why?
BG: Being a designer I am of course a very visual person. In my designs I focus on the use of graphic pattern and colour palette, as I think in combination these can have a powerful effect on one’s mood – we all have a very visceral reaction to colour and pattern. Recently I’ve designed a café. The brief was to evoke an emotion of my choice – and I chose “calm”. We created cosy inviting areas, using pink and jade veneer fretwork, with inlayed brass. The result was also very textural, which added a sense of belonging and warmth.  Finally wave music was added to really promote a sense of balance and harmony. It’s been very effective.
An Interview With Bethan Gray : Winner of Prestigious Best British Designer Award
TID : What is your own personal mantra when it comes to any product you design?
BG: I focus on creating pieces that are warm, contemporary, timeless and elegant. I love to use high-quality natural materials, with a focus on craftsmanship – pushing the boundaries where possible.
TID : As a first time visitor to INDEX, where we have more than 800 furniture and product exhibitors, what kind of items on show do you think will really pique your interest?
BG: I’ve been working closely with master craftsmen from the GCC for many years now, from founding the Ruby Tree with Islamic Arts and Crafts Scholar M Abdul Karim Crites to working with renowned Iranian artist Mohamed Reza Shamsian in Oman. I’m really looking forward to seeing other elements of master craftsmen’s work on show that I may not have come across before.
bethan gray
TID : What are some of your favourite 2017 design trends?
BG: For me, 2017 colours such as pink, jade and teal will continue to be popular, especially in combination with warm metallics. Rich patterns and textures will be combined in a new contemporary decorative style. This is a big move away from the Scandinavian pared-back style we’ve seen dominate over the last few years.
The pieces you create have “a rich pattern of influences and inspirations, which draw on craft traditions of both East and West”, with you citing your own Arabian heritage as being a key influence on your work. What similarities do you find between the two design styles, despite their obvious differences? What is your secret to combining the two in a way that seems so natural and organic?
BG: In my work, I focus on the similarities between the craft traditions of the East and West. In fact, the East has been very instrumental in inspiring and informing design styles that are now common place in the West – such as monochrome. It’s my own and my ancestor’s journeys that influence and inspire me to look for these similarities.
At the heart of my design process is cultural referencing – through my travels and research I’m inspired to create original contemporary pieces that resonate with global, as well as local, audiences.
An Interview With Bethan Gray : Winner of Prestigious Best British Designer Award
TID : Where, for you, does the balance lie between style and functionality in both design and interiors?
BG: For me, design itself is about finding the right balance. I like to create an atmosphere that is inclusive and comfortable, featuring symmetry, making it easy on the eye and helping balance the senses.  It’s important to me though that this balance is carried through in terms of usage and practicality of the interiors, and with pragmatism and functionality important in the design of the pieces.
TID : What can you tell us about your latest range?
BG: My latest range is the Shamsian Collection, created in collaboration with Mohamed Reza Shamsian, a highly sought after, masterful Iranian artist, and his team of 70 highly skilled craftsmen based in Muscat, Oman. The collection is inspired by regional architecture, and features intricate marquetry, a traditional Islamic craft dating back to the sixteenth century, on Italian stained birds-eye maple, in stunning combination with solid brass or iridescent mother of pearl. Detailing on the beautiful Nizwa cabinet takes inspiration from the rounded architectural castellation patterning of the Nizwa Fort in Oman whereas detailing on the Dhow takes inspiration from the sails of the regional sailing boats.

 

Gossip Queen    Gossip Queen

She doesn’t need any introduction. She is quintessentially the part of every gossip – sorry – networking circle in Design World. She is always updated with the best of Designers and their small beautiful World. If you would like your Interiors to be club class, then follow our advice and network with her..

PIERRE-PERRET SCHOOL’S EXTERIOR IN FRANCE IS DESIGNED LIKE AN UFO

PIERRE-PERRET SCHOOL’S EXTERIOR IN FRANCE IS DESIGNED LIKE AN UFO

Ameller, Dubois & Associés  : The early childhood school complex designed by Philippe Ameller and Jacques Dubois in the suburban town of Serris, east of Paris, does not seem to be particularly alien or extravagant. But the urban context makes the new building a real UFO, as the Pierre-Perret school is located near Disneyland Paris.
Pierre-Perret School's Exterior in France is Designed Like an UFO
Pierre-Perret School's Exterior in France is Designed Like an UFO
Since its inauguration in 1992, the notorious amusement park has been a true engine of economic development. But it also provides its peculiar aesthetic direction, somewhere between The Truman Show and an impersonation of Parisian late XIXth century style. In this artificial area, the architects challenged the local mainstream tastes with their new school.
Pierre-Perret School's Exterior in France is Designed Like an UFO
Pierre-Perret School's Exterior in France is Designed Like an UFO
“We did think of this school project as an opportunity – and almost a duty – to place there a hint, a clue about what a pleasant life may be away from the Disneyland influences. A humble piece of genuine architecture of the early XXIst century seemed to be what the inhabitants of Serris needed most, for their youngest children to grow aware of their time.”
Pierre-Perret School's Exterior in France is Designed Like an UFO
Pierre-Perret School's Exterior in France is Designed Like an UFO
Fortunately, a recent awards jury shared this point of view, and liked the wooden touch of the design (totally alien to Serris until then). “No one felt insulted”, says Jacques Dubois, “as we certainly did not make fun of the existing town. We just felt it deserved to switch to something a little more genuine, step by step. This is the first step, and the population seems to appreciate it.”
Pierre-Perret School's Exterior in France is Designed Like an UFO

 

Travel Journo    Travel Journo

A Globetrotter with endless appetite to travel. Always looking for something unique in Interior trends and getting us, the best of every new design trend. All new interior décor trends happening under the might Sun, cannot escape his eyes… follow him to follow the best in global design trends.

IS IT TIME TO CHANGE YOUR PILLOW ?

IS IT TIME TO CHANGE YOUR PILLOW ?

Is it time to change your Pillow ?
Home Decor : When it comes to mattresses and pillows, not many homeowners know when they should really be changing it. This is also partly because it’s not clear why they should be changed in the first place since these items seldom break apart literally. However, a good mattress and pillow is essential to ensuring that you get the proper space for a good night’s rest. For mattresses, they should be changed every 10 years (regardless of the type of filling – spring coil, latex foam, memory foam, etc).
If a pillow isn’t not broken, why change it?
You’ve probably heard this tons of times: older pillows are less supportive, and can lead to back and neck aches. But that’s not our central concern today.
According to the Sleep Council in the UK (how one gets on that council is another worthy topic altogether), up to a third of your pillow’s weight could be made up of bugs, dead skin cells, dust mites and their carcasses and faeces.
Is it time to change your Pillow ?
Your pillow is basically a sponge that absorbs your bodily fluids, and kept at an ideal temperature by your warm body lying on top to allow said pests to multiply – it’s as good a breeding ground as it gets!
A dirty pillow can cause acne, infections, or trigger allergic reactions or asthma. Even if you change your pillowcases regularly – as these nightmarish buggers are still living in your pillow.
Pillowcases should be washed every week – that’s pretty much common knowledge – but your pillow itself should be washed at least once every 3 months. And as much as we understand the emotional attachment we all grow to have towards our pillows, unfortunately, experts recommend that they should be replaced every 2-3 years. A good way to tell when your pillow needs changing would be to fold it in half, and if it doesn’t flatten out again, then it’s time to get a new one. However, this may be difficult to test with thick memory foam pillows. The best way to tell if your pillow needs to be changed, would be when your neck begins to experience aches when you wake up in the mornings. That means your pillow is no longer providing the same level of support as it used to.
Is it time to change your Pillow ?
Buying a new pillow
Get the right fit 
Your pillow should fill the gap between your head and shoulders when you lie down.
This also means your sleeping position matters. For instance, if you sleep on your back, get a pillow fluffy enough to lift your head and chin for easy breathing; if you sleep flat on your tummy, get a soft, flat pillow to keep your head level.
Choose a suitable stuffing 
Down pillows are the fluffiest and most plush to sleep on, but if you need firmer support, you might want to opt for foam pillows instead.
Different types of stuffing also have different lifespans, which is something you might want to factor in when considering cost.

 

Ms. Housekeeper    Ms. Housekeeper

Our contributor of impeccable knowledge on day to day house care with her quick and easy to implement suggestions. Her knowledge makes our life easy- multi fold. Get enriched with her best suggestions… follow her.

INTRODUCING THE 2016 DESIGNERS IN RESIDENCE

INTRODUCING THE 2016 DESIGNERS IN RESIDENCE

Introducing the 2016 Designers in Residence

Design Museum : 2016 is the ninth year of the Design Museum’s annual Designers in Residence programme which provides a platform to celebrate new and emerging designers at an early stage in their career. Recent alumni include Asif Khan, Giles Miller, Bethan Laura Wood, Yuri Suzuki and Sarah van Gameren.

This year’s selected designers will spend four months responding to the theme of ‘Open’. The work they create will be displayed in a dedicated Designers in Residence Studio at the Design Museum when it opens in its new Kensington home on 24th November 2016.

The 2016 Designers in Residence are: Alix Bizet, Clementine Blakemore, Andrea de Chirico and Rain Wu.

Alix Bizet

Alix Bizet’s practice combines an interest in the theory, philosophy and psychology of human sciences with a passion for human behaviour and the environment. Alix studied Fine Arts/Curation at La Sorbonnes in Paris, and went on to study Product Design at Central Saint Martins in London. She graduated from the Design Academy in Eindhoven with an MA in Social Design.

Alix Bizet’s

By re-appropriating textile techniques she explores hair as a material and medium through which to explore cultural difference and community. Her experimental approach to materials and techniques creates work which explores anthropology, identity and fashion through which she challenges convention and taboos whilst celebrating diversity.

Clementine Blakemore  ( Title Image ) is a London-based architectural designer, interested in the relationship between design, production and place. After a year at the Rural Studio in Alabama, she studied architecture at the Architectural Association and then went on to Royal College of Art where she completed her MA Architecture in 2015.

Clementine Blakemore

Her final design thesis – an outdoor classroom for a school in rural Buckinghamshire – was awarded a Sustain RCA award, Highly Commended in the Helen Hamlyn Design awards, and went on to receive a RIBA McAslan bursary. In 2012 she co-found the non-profit collective WORKSHOP architecture, and completed two educational spaces for schools in India – these projects have been published and exhibited globally. She has led a number of design/build workshops as part of the AA’s Visiting School program over the past four years, and will continue to explore the potential in collaborative building processes during the residency. She has previously worked for David Chipperfield Architects, and is currently working for Duggan Morris Architects.

http://www.andreadechirico.com/

Andrea de Chirico role as a designer is interdisciplinary, working across the fields of product, graphics, interaction and system design. His approach is collaborative, designing new production scenarios for everyday objects. Processes of making are not often visible but revealing the ways objects are made can highlight a social and ecological consciousness around local manufacturing.

Andrea de Chirico

He studied for a BA in Industrial Design at ISIA in Rome, followed by Designer Maker course at Plymouth University in the UK. In 2015 he graduated with an MA in Social Design from the Design Academy Eindhoven. Andrea was recently appointed as lecturer and researcher for the course Design and Production at the University of Bolzano, in Italy.

Introducing the 2016 Designers in Residence

Rain Wu is a Taiwanese-born, London-based architect, working across the fields of art and design with specific interests in material development, speculative narratives and interactive spatial experiences. She graduated from the Bartlett School of Architecture UCL in 2009 and then went on to an MA in Architecture at Royal College of Art. Professionally she has worked at a number of architectural practices worldwide including Carmody Groarke in London and Sou Fujimoto Architects in Tokyo.

Rain Wu

She has lectured and exhibited internationally as well as collaborated with professionals from different disciplines to explore architecture’s versatility in art and design. Her architectural background informs her work but her practice is multi-disciplinary using drawings, sculptures and set design to articulate her ideas. For the residency, she is interested in finding new ways to engage audiences and reimagine the exhibition format, she uses food as a storytelling device considering the connections to relationships and experiences.

The Designers in Residence programme provides young designers with time and space to research and consider new ways of progressing their work and practice. During the development of their projects, residents discuss their work with established practitioners, industry experts and residency alumni, as well as with the Design Museum’s legal, commercial, learning, development, and curatorial teams. Each resident is offered a bursary, commissioning budget and the production costs required to realise their new commission. The programme offers opportunities for the designers to present and discuss their work within a broader context of contemporary practice, provoking their approach and design thinking to offer new and exciting directions within the fields of design.

Photo Courtesy : The Design Museum

IN LIFELONG PURSUIT OF DESIGNS : DR PETER ZEC

IN LIFELONG PURSUIT OF DESIGNS : DR PETER ZEC

In Lifelong Pursuit Of Designs : Dr Peter Zec

Red Dot Design Awards 2016 : Business News : On 1 April 1991, Peter Zec took over the running of the Design Zentrum Nordrhein Westfalen. Since its founding in 1954, the organisation had largely been active at a regional level and held design competitions focused on German products. Peter Zec saw the opportunity to develop global recognition for an organisation that had, until then, not been well known. Twenty-five years on, the Design Zentrum boasts international branch offices and has achieved world renown with the coveted Red Dot award. The organisation’s head has become one of the best known personalities in the design world whose stars he regularly entices to visit Essen.